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Course summary

The Master of Laws (LLM) postgraduate programme is for students who are looking to enhance their legal careers, build on their past practice or focus on new areas of law. The flexibility of the programme and over 40 modules on offer means that you can define your own Master of Laws (LLM) postgraduate experience. Our students come from a wide range of backgrounds. Some have just completed undergraduate degrees while others have experience in private practice at law firms or as in-house counsel. We also welcome students who have experience of non-legal work in sectors including finance and energy, public service and NGOs. A law degree is not necessarily required. Objectives The Master of Laws (LLM) at City, University of London has a practical, global focus designed to deepen your knowledge and accelerate your career or simply introduce you to new and exciting areas of law. The programme has been structured to showcase current legal debates, and to expose you to professional practitioners and leading academics. It will give you the skills to tackle complex legal problems within your chosen area while also offering a wealth of opportunities including pro bono clinics, guest lectures, recruitment fairs and internships. The diverse nature of our student body means that you will benefit from sharing experiences and widening your horizons in the world’s leading legal centre. Specialisms All LLM degree applications are assessed for the general Master of Laws programme. Once you receive an offer to study the LLM, you have the option of choosing one of our specialist LLM pathways which are made up of a particular selection of elective modules. You could take one of these specialisms:

  • International Litigation and Dispute Resolution
  • Criminal Litigation
  • International Banking and Finance Law
  • International Commercial Law
  • International Human Rights
  • Maritime Law
  • Public International Law

Modules

Your learning will depend on whether you take the general Master of Laws LLM and choose from more than 30 modules, or whether you study one of a number of specialist LLM programmes that require you to study certain modules. The programme will be delivered using a hybrid model of delivery. For each taught module you will have a one hour weekly lecture and a one hour weekly interactive seminar. Assessment will draw on a range of approaches which include written coursework, presentations, skills work, in-class tests, projects and a dissertation. The majority of modules will be assessed on the basis of written coursework of 5,000-5,500 words. The 30-credit dissertation module will involve the submission of a dissertation of 10,000 words on a subject agreed with your supervisor/Programme Director. If you decide to opt for the 60-credit dissertation instead, you will need to submit a dissertation of 20,000 words on a subject agreed with your supervisor/Programme Director. Most modules have a single combined assessment with 100% weighting but there are some where there is more than one assessment and the weighting for each will be 50%. You have the option of completing formative coursework in each module. The formative assessment will give you an opportunity to understand and appreciate the academic levels expected. At different stages of the programme, you will have the opportunity to develop and demonstrate legal research, quantitative, cognitive and other skills in addition to your knowledge and understanding of the subjects. The dissertation gives you an opportunity to display competence in legal research and to explore your specific interests more deeply. There is a degree of autonomous learning at this stage in the programme. You will be demonstrating how you can manage information as well as developing complex arguments and in some cases innovative solutions to specific legal problems. Each assessment tests whether you:

  • have grasped the relevant principles;
  • are able to analyse and interpret those principles critically;
  • are able to apply them to complex factual problems; and
- can present the relevant points in concise, clear and grammatical terms.

Assessment method

Assessment will draw on a range of approaches which include written coursework, presentations, skills work, in-class tests, projects and a dissertation. The majority of modules will be assessed on the basis of written coursework of 5,000-5,500 words. The 30-credit dissertation module will involve the submission of a dissertation of 10,000 words on a subject agreed with your supervisor/Programme Director. If you decide to opt for the 60-credit dissertation instead, you will need to submit a dissertation of 20,000 words on a subject agreed with your supervisor/Programme Director. Most modules have a single combined assessment with 100% weighting but there are some where there is more than one assessment and the weighting for each will be 50%. You have the option of completing formative coursework in each module. The formative assessment will give you an opportunity to understand and appreciate the academic levels expected. At different stages of the programme, you will have the opportunity to develop and demonstrate legal research, quantitative, cognitive and other skills in addition to your knowledge and understanding of the subjects. The dissertation gives you an opportunity to display competence in legal research and to explore your specific interests more deeply. There is a degree of autonomous learning at this stage in the programme. You will be demonstrating how you can manage information as well as developing complex arguments and in some cases innovative solutions to specific legal problems. Each assessment tests whether you:

  • have grasped the relevant principles;
  • are able to analyse and interpret those principles critically;
  • are able to apply them to complex factual problems; and
- can present the relevant points in concise, clear and grammatical terms.


Entry requirements

We are interested in receiving applications from individuals with at least an upper second-class honours undergraduate degree in law (roughly equivalent to a B or B+) from a recognised international institution. Applicants with a good undergraduate degree in another subject will also be considered. How do we make our decision? In reaching our admission decisions we will take account of: Academic performance Reasons for choice of courses/career Evidence of intellectual ability References Relevant work experience/activity INTO City, University of London Don’t meet the entry requirements? INTO City, University of London offers a range of academic and English language programmes to help prepare you for study at City, University of London. You’ll learn from experienced teachers in a dedicated international study centre. These programmes are designed for international students who do not meet the required academic and English language requirements for direct entry. To prepare for this degree course, learn more about the Graduate Diploma in Law.


Fees and funding

Tuition fees

EU £19990 Year 1
England £14220 Year 1
Northern Ireland £14220 Year 1
Scotland £14220 Year 1
Wales £14220 Year 1
International £19990 Year 1

Additional fee information

No additional fees or cost information has been supplied for this course, please contact the provider directly.
Master of Laws at City, University of London - UCAS